2.7.15


Each step forward, if the sacrum is in, will kick the head upward and backward. The secret here – the invisible ingredient – is tension in the perineum. Without it the hips will not release sufficient to allow the knees to lead the lower body.
My ambition, if I have one, is to love God the way a tree loves God: simply, by virtue of posture; without question.

30.6.15

"The air thin and pure, danger near at hand, and the spirit full of a joyful wickedness: these things go well together."

27.6.15

I think and I go astray.
The courage to be happy.
The heart blooms like a flower. Or it should. The spine is the stem of the flower, the legs are the roots. The head is the stigma, the neck the style, and the deep heart the ovary. When the head and heart are clear then they are naturally fed by energy from the Earth through the spine. When the head feeds on its own thoughts or the heart on its own feelings then the flower becomes top heavy and begins to droop, putting strain on the spine which in time becomes deformed. Meditation endeavours to lighten head and heart so that the spine can become more upright and thereby do what it is designed to do: channel energy from Earth to Heaven.

24.6.15

Between stability and instability.
Good posture uses gravity and core strength to pump energy up from the Earth and into the heart, head and beyond. Taiji is particularly difficult because it attempts to connect directly forward to the Other with the heart, at the same time that the head connects to the Heavens, up and behind. So our Taiji is a constant process of balancing the desires of Heart and Head, that is, yielding. When achieved the resultant energy is soft, delightful and quite unique.
...the obliteration of the thought of myself – that specious concept of identity...
The internal dialogue, or rather monologue, that interminably maddening stream of garbage (it would be presumptuous to call it consciousness), has been installed to protect us from the onslaught of reality: to protect our tender precious hearts from the gash and dash of sensory experience. It becomes, with age, a tough skin of opinions and habits of mind, through which real life finds it harder and harder to penetrate. Eventually the skin becomes so impermeable that the person enters a sort of limbo: not yet dead but also no longer alive. This is why the main thrust of our work is struggling to achieve some inner peace so that we can start to truly listen to something other (than self).
It takes a certain maturity to experience the texture of life as a series of simultaneous layers: to be aware that no matter the feeling or the intensity, it's just a tiny part of whatever I'm in the midst of. That's why the eyes are filled with a mixture of wonder and terror.

23.6.15

Heartwork. Developing a sense of humour. Making light as the first step to making fire. The heart becomes so light, in fact, that the root is necessary to stop the body lifting off the ground. It is then simply a matter of keeping the mind always with this light(ness).

22.6.15

Our journey, needlessly protracted though it tends to be, is simply from head to heart, from head-mind to heart-mind. The head perceives the world as a collection of objects, and of communication as a calculated exchange, whereas the heart feels the world as flows of energy, the principle flow being from itself. When the head operates at the expense of the heart we have what the Buddhists call suffering and what Nietzsche calls resentment: a state of serious disconnectedness which leaves a tragic void in one's soul that can then only be filled with an idle disconnected rant and complaint at one's overwhelming feeling of dissatisfaction and anger. To try and make sense of this rant – one's internal dialogue – is the wrong way. Instead one must find a practice to wake up the heart so that that terrible feeling of emptiness can slowly change to a burgeoning bubbling of heartfelt energy. This, via the heart, is, I believe, the only way to a healthy soul.
Tense shoulders are the consequence of the head not trusting the heart.

19.6.15

Marx is as relevant today as he was 100 years ago: just replace 'exploited proletariat' with 'stupid consumer.'
"The flood of precise information and brand-new amusements make people smarter and more stupid at once."

Theodore Adorno, 1944
Taiji is a natural way to bring shape and movement – understanding and refinement – to energy by activating the limbs (legs, arms, eyes) whilst meditating.
Without real care and attention the remedy so readily becomes the poison.